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Pixel portraits and paintings
The artwork on this page was created in Affinity Photo. Some portraits / paintings were started in Corel PhotoPain(t), but continued in Affinity Photo after the Corel program suddenly crashed on exporting them as png-files. I became frustrated and accidently encountered Serif's Affinity Photo, which actually was a blessing since it precisely had the functionality that I was looking for while it did not crash during the editing of large and complex files. Affinity Photo makes it easy to work on a project that was created in other programs, because it flawlessly imports psd-files, retaining their layer structure correctly, in addition to which further editing in Affinity Photo adds parametric properties. This feature is unparalleled.

Click to visit the portrait progress sequence in my blog

Willie Nelson
My most recent pixel portrait that was started in Corel PhotoPain(t) and completed in Affinity Photo after the first continuously crashed. Affinity Photo has magnificent brushes that are excellently tunable, which makes painting a joy. Creating pixel images requires less time than making vector drawings, because of the dynamic versatilty of the brushes. Click on the image to visit my portfolio blog where the various stages of the portrait are shown. Willie Nelson's approach to life is as interesting as his appearance.

Click to visit the portrait progress sequence in my blog

Al Pacino
The photo of Al Pacino persuaded me to create his portrait. I like faces that tell a story by way of their characteristics, often reflecting experiences of unpleasant events. Smooth faces devoid of creases, wrinkles and / or pronounced pores do not represent a challenge to paint. This portrait was started in Corel PhotoPain(t) and completed in Affinity Photo (I tend to work on several projects simultaneously in order to avert becoming bored). Click on the image to visit the various stages of progress of the portrait on my portfolio blog post. I am considering to paint the neck, shirt and background, all of which I can place on layers that I can switch on or turn off at will. It is an other advantage of digital art creation that can't be matched by traditional, analogue ways of creating art.

Click to visit the portrait progress sequence in my blog

Henk Kuipers
No Surrender president Henk Kuipers is a fascinating person with a matching face. The corrupt media conjure all sorts of libellous reports that were invented to create a public bias rather than painting a correct version of reality. This portrait was started in Corel PhotoPain(t) and still is not finished, but it will be soon. Click on the image to visit the various stages of progress of the portrait in my portfolio blog post. As is the case with many other people, it is unclear if he will ever see justice take its proper course, but that does not stop him from doing what he believes he needs to do.

Click to visit the portrait progress sequence in my blog

Lakota warrior 'Kills First'
This pixel portrait was one of my first. The reference image was an old black and white photo shot by Gertrude Kasebier. I was intrigued by his arresting gaze and his name sake leaves little to imagination, which I tried to embed in the expression in his face. I find it fascinating to imagine what his life in a distant and different world may have been like and to capture the reflection of his experience in a portrait. Click on the image to visit my blog, showing the various stages of progress of the portrait in my portfolio blog post.

Click to visit the portrait progress sequence in my blog

Kiowa warrior
I learned on a Native American forum that when warriors wear their hair braided, they are at peace. When they wear it half braided, their nation is at war, but they do not (yet) participate. When they wear their hair loose, they are ready to fight. There is an other interesting article on why Native American warriors wear long hair. Native American trackers in the US Army were allowed to wear long hair because it allowed them to use their sixth sense. Click on the image to visit my blog, showing the various stages of progress of the portrait on my portfolio blog post.

Click to visit the portrait progress sequence in my blog

Proud men
This pixel portrait was inspired by the brilliant American painter Howard Terpning. It was (again) created in Corel PhotoPain(t) before I had discovered Affinity Photo, in which I completed the portrait. I liked the Corel programs a lot in the past, but bug imbued programs tend to be discarded by their clients at some point. Click on the image to visit the portrait's progress sequence in my portfolio blog.

Peace pipes and Winchesters

The painting below was inspired by yet an other painting of Howard Terpning to which I added a number of details that weren't present in the original painting - the peace pipe, the Winchester rifle and background as well as the elder's facial expression and details in textures and / or appearance skin, clothes, hair, grass, rocks and background sky etc.). I started the painting in Corel PhotoPain(t) before it began crashing continuously and worked on it further in Affinity Photo. It is still not quite finished, but the work that needs to be done on it is not very extensive. In this painting I got more familiar with Affinity Photo's brilliant brush functionality, which is reflected in the way the grass in the foreground is painted. I created the brush and tuned its dynamics allowing me to swiftly paint grass.

Warrior gathering

Below you see an other painting that was inspired by the late, great Howard Terpning. I am convinced of the fact that it is extremely difficult or impossible for artists to correctly capture people and settings of a place and era that is not ones own. Terpning live much closer to Native Americans than I did and I am grateful for his interpretations of a time and place long gone. Time changes everything in any plane causing many things to slip out of memory. The lack of information of far away scenes and events gives way to imagination to create an abundance of interpretations. Many of which are not related to the reality that artists try to capture. The progress sequence and nature of personal changes of this painting are similar to the 'Peace pipes and Winchesters' painting, which becomes obvious when comparing it with Mr. Terpning's magnificent original.

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